Education

We want to promote the education of users on the topic of concussion through PACA provided content in a format that is easily accessible and easy to understand. If you would like more information on concussions visit the Resources page; This page focus’ on the concept of holism, developing and healing the whole athlete, and mental health.

What is a concussion? How Do They Happen?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth.

Signs and symptoms of a concussion

Concussion Signs Observed

  • Can’t recall events prior to or after a hit or fall.
  • Appears dazed or stunned.
  • Forgets an instruction, is confused about an assignment or position or is unsure of the game, score, or opponent.
  • Moves clumsily.
  • Answers questions slowly.
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly).
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes.

Concussion Symptoms Reported

  • Headache or “pressure” in the head.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Balance problems or dizziness, or double or blurry vision.
  • Bothered by light or noise.
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy.
  • Confusion, or concentration, or memory problems.
  • Just not “feeling right,” or “feeling down”.
Long-term affects

Post-concussion headaches can vary and may feel like tension-type headaches or migraines. Most often, they are tension-type headaches. These may be associated with a neck injury that happened at the same time as the head injury.

Risk factors for developing persistent post-concussive symptoms include:

  • Age. Studies have found increasing age to be a risk factor for persistent post-concussive symptoms.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to be diagnosed with persistent post-concussive symptoms, but this may be because women are generally more likely to seek medical care.
How concussions affect mental health

Mild and severe traumatic brain injury (concussion and TBI) can cause upsetting changes to your mental health. You may find that preexisting mental illness worsens after your injury or that new symptoms — such as anxiety, depression, mood swings, anger, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and more — arise.

Get in Touch. Get Involved.

Share Your Story!

Sharing your story is one of the best ways to spread concussion awareness. All submissions will be sent to our social media team and they will follow up with you to ensure your story gets shared on our social media page!

Volunteering

Join our volunteer team and help to contribute to local education and awareness on concussions in sport.

Community Partner

Join our growing network of community partners and help us work on projects that expand the local communities capacity for concussion education and awareness.